Body Shape Assessment and ELBV

For many years seating companies and DSE assessment companies have focussed on the limb measurements of individuals in order to influence or suggest the selection of a particular combination of seat pad size, backrest heights or armrest adjustment levels. Indeed, this practice has resulted in the creation of indicative average (anthropometric) measurements in order to determine the “correct” sizes for the purposes of the creation of norms.

However, limb measurements are implicitly 2-dimensional – point A to point B – without a true relation to other more 3-dimensional characteristics. This is particularly true when assessors try to measure individuals with unusual body proportions caused by the distribution of their body volume.

Implicit in the process of limb length measurement is the need for the user to be seated. This brings new and unexpected implications to any recorded measurements. This is particularly the case for individuals who possess a higher level of body volume at the rear, large thighs or large calves. We can refer to this as a user with “Excess Lower Body Volume”- ELBV.

Users with ELBV often demonstrate a longer popliteal (buttock to inside knee) length due to the additional body layers at the rear. This body volume distribution can also result in heightening the position of the body on the chair so that the position of the lumbar is also raised. There is also a possibility that the popliteal length is reduced because of the body volume at the rear of the calf that corresponds with the position of the front of the seat pad.

The purpose of these examples is simply to illustrate that it is often an understanding of the 3-dimensional interaction of a user’s Body Shape that influences the correct size or “fit” of chair for the individual, rather than a simpler assessment based on 2-dimensional measurement.

In 2013, Status adjusted its Anthropometrical Data Sheet to include an indication of body shape, also adjusting its assessment sheet to be known as a Body Shape Assessment Form.

Limb measurements are important, but having a more representative indication of a person’s shape helps employers to find a chair that is more likely to be a “fit” for the individual.

Click here to download a copy of the Status Body Assessment Form from our website.

Cervical Spondylosis 

Symptoms of cervical spondylosis include neck pain and shoulder pain. The pain can be severe in some cases. Occasional headaches may also occur, which usually start at the back of the head, just above the neck, and travel over the top to the forehead. Pain usually comes and goes, with flare-ups followed by symptom-free periods. Around 1 in 10 sufferers develop long-lasting (chronic) pain.

Other, more severe, symptoms usually only occur if you develop:

  • cervical radiculopathy – where a slipped disc or other bone pinches or irritates a nearby nerve
  • cervical myelopathy – where the spinal canal (bones that surround and protect the nerves) becomes narrower, compressing the spinal cord inside

Cervical radiculopathy

The most common symptom of cervical radiculopathy is a sharp pain that “travels” down one of your arms (also known as brachialgia).

You may also experience some numbness or “pins and needles” in the affected arm, and find that stretching your neck and turning your head makes the pain worse.

Cervical myelopathy

Cervical myelopathy occurs when severe cervical spondylosis causes narrowing of the spinal canal and compression of the spinal cord.

When the spinal cord is compressed, it interferes with the signals that travel between your brain and the rest of your body. Symptoms can include:

  • a lack of co-ordination – for example, you may find tasks such as buttoning a shirt increasingly difficult
  • heaviness or weakness in your arms or legs
  • problems walking
  • less commonly, urinary incontinence
    (loss of bladder control)
  • bowel incontinence (loss of bowel control)

If you think you are experiencing symptoms of cervical myelopathy, see your GP as soon as possible.

Left untreated, cervical myelopathy can lead to permanent spinal cord damage and long-term disability

Source: NHS Choices

2016 Price List

Dear Customer

The team at Status is pleased to have been able to reduce the prices of many of the options available for our highly adaptable Humanfactor range which, for many models, will result in us being able to maintain 2015 prices overall or even offer a slight reduction in RRP.

Other retail prices for our more basic Status model ranges have been raised by around 2% on average depending on the model combination. This has mainly been due to increases in upholstery fabric prices.

A hard copy version of the Issue 2 price list is currently being printed and will be in circulation very shortly.
We thank you for your business and look forward to a successful 2016.

Please do not hesitate to contact us with any enquiries at our offices in High Wycombe where our team will be happy to help.

Yours Sincerely

Simon Barrett
Managing Director